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The Anatomy of a Well-Layered Bed

The Anatomy of a Well-Layered Bed

The other day I mentioned what I like to call a well-matched mismatched bed in a post about designer Louisa Pierce’s Nashville home. It dawned on me that some of you may be unfamiliar with such a concept. So, ever wishing to be a source of enlightenment for you all, I’ve decided to break it down for you. Behold; the anatomy of a well-layered bed.

You’re welcome.

 [ Photo by  Avenue Lifestyle  ]

[ Photo by Avenue Lifestyle ]

Okay, though I joke about the idea of a layered, mismatched vibe, it is actually something that will add warmth- both literally and figuratively- to your space. By layering different textiles, you can adjust the temperature of your bed to your liking. It’s also a great way to incorporate luxurious materials like linen and cashmere in small (ie. affordable!) amounts without it looking like you just couldn’t afford the whole set (which, let’s be real, is probably the case).

 [ Photo by  The Family Love Tree  ]

By doing some on-purpose mismatching, you can embrace the eclectic look and use several cushions made from a similar fabric. Maybe you have a small amount of fabric that you could sew up into a pillowcase? Recycle the fabric from old clothes or tablecloths. This may sound like a bit of hassle, but DIY pillowcases are pretty straightforward and you’ll find tons of online tutorials.

If you’re partial to white linens, consider using a coloured headboard to add contrast. Alternatively, you could use painted nightstands on either side of the bed. Pick one option or the other, not both. Colour overkill will make it look like a Montessori school.

 [ Photo by  Tessa Neustadt  for  Amber Interiors  ]

Speaking of! Kids’ rooms are a great opportunity to get creative with vintage fabrics and pieces you may consider to twee for other rooms in the house. By playing around with ditsy patterns, you can create a space that’s whimsical and special enough to keep gaudy Disney duvets, made from frickin’ polyethylene terephthalate, far, far away. (Little insight into the mother I intend to be someday.)

 [ Photo by  Tessa Neustadt  for  Amber Interiors  ]

Neutrals don’t have to be boring. White is classic and a popular choice for bedlinen. But look out for pieces with lace or crochet trim to add interest to the look. Mix in one or two other colours; even if they’re also fairly neutral, and at least one patterned piece. Decorative cushions can be transient, so it would be wise to invest in good quality white sheets and skimp on trendy add-ons.

 [ Photo by  Mark D. Sikes  ]

[ Photo by Mark D. Sikes ]

The secret to mixing fabrics successfully is to keep everything within the same colour family. That way you can use different patterns and scales without it looking messy. Here we have a bed that uses five prints; but it all works because everything is kept to a similar denim blue tone and offset with plenty of white.

[ Main photo by Pottery Barn ]

For more dreamy bedrooms, check out my aptly-named bedroom Pinterest board, { d r e a m }. It’s one of my faves.

Ciara Elliott's Boho Country Home

Ciara Elliott's Boho Country Home

Pierce & Ward Designer's Layered Nashville Home

Pierce & Ward Designer's Layered Nashville Home